Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Hiram Arnold

For this Memorial Day, instead of visiting the grave of my Uncle Frank, who was killed in Vietnam three days before his twentieth birthday, or of my grandfather, whose body was still expelling shrapnel from WWII on his deathbed in 2006, I visited Great-Great-Grandpa Arnold’s grave.

Hiram Arnold (Great-Great-Grandfather)
Hiram Arnold came to Texas from Ohio in his early twenties. When he was 23 he married Thirza Birchfield. After losing their first child, twins were born in 1861: Jefferson Davis Arnold and John Baylor Arnold.

(If you're not familiar with Confederate leaders or the Civil War, Jefferson Davis was the President of the Confederate States of America; John Baylor was a US Indian agent, publisher and editor, politician, a senior officer of the Confederate States Army (CSA), and all-around piece of human garbage keen on murder and genocide. Thankfully, we don't have many more lackluster namesakes in our family.)

When I was researching this branch of my family I found someone online who had speculated that Hiram must have been a die-hard Confederate since he named his sons after Davis and Baylor. That assumption is simplistic at best. It’s not as if he owned a plantation and slaves.

It’s far more likely that Hiram, because of his well-documented poverty, had been working alongside slaves in the cotton fields of Texas. It’s also likely he fought against family members and childhood friends who served in the Union from his home state of Ohio, where his parents and siblings are buried. I think poverty and being a newly-arrived settler in the South are sorely under-analyzed dimensions in understanding the race ideology of the Confederacy.

The following year, in 1862, Hiram enlisted in the CSA. He served in Company I, 30th Texas Cavalry for about two years, then served with Company A, 29th Texas Cavalry until the end of the War. He fought in the Battle of Mansfield and the Battle of Pleasant Hill, both in Louisiana, under Major General John G. Walker's command. His company surrendered at Galveston in June of 1865 at the close of the War.

In 1881, when he was 45, my Great-Grandma Thirza Garrett, née Arnold, was born. My family used to visit her at the old folks home on weekends after we moved back to east Texas. She always had one of those giant, thick two-pound peppermint sticks that us kids could chip off pieces of. She died when I was 6. Hers is the first funeral I remember.

It wasn’t until a few years ago that I learned about her father Hiram. I’m still amazed that I knew someone whose father fought in the Civil War, albeit on the losing side.

In January 1911, at the age of 73, Hiram applied for and was granted a Confederate Pension. On his application, he listed a handful of blacksmith tools in a country shop as his only assets. As attested by the county judge, he lived in his shop and did his own cooking, "with no property other than his tools." He died of stomach cancer in 1917 at the age of 80.

Saturday, May 18, 2019

In Search of Babushka

Babushka's Journey: The Dark Road to Stalin's Wartime Camps is an eloquent travel memoir that also manages to do the heavy lifting required by great historical writing. Though German-born and typically Ireland-based, author Marcel Krueger is currently carrying out the duties of writer-in-residence in Olsztyn, Poland. You can follow his blog in German and in English.

Published by I.B. Tauris in 2018, Babushka's Journey is a welcome addition to the better known histories of trauma of the twentieth century, filling a niche that most World War II and Gulag narratives barely mention: the fate of East Prussian women during the final days of the war.

Krueger beautifully narrates both the story of his grandmother Cilly and her rural childhood that was interrupted when the Soviet army advanced into the region in January 1945 as well as of his own present-day attempt to trace her journey east, through Poland and on to Yekaterinburg, where she worked in various POW labor camps in the region until October 1949.

He brings fresh insight into what it meant to be a German POW in Stalin's Soviet Union by not only conducting archival research and interviewing primary sources but also through recreating the diet that his grandmother would have eaten in the camps and the physiological toll such a diet will take on the human body. He captures both the bleak winter of 1945 and the stifling summer heat of Eastern Europe during his own travels.

Babushka's Journey raises the standard of historical research and how that research can serve as the basis to a compelling and memorable narrative.


Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org

Thursday, May 16, 2019

In Memory of Little Beasts

I'm devastated, and I've been bawling my eyes out for days now. I went to bed Friday evening sure that my little family was safe and well, only to lose my little boy in the night. He wasn't ill. Despite being deaf, he was probably the fittest cat I've ever known. But he died early Saturday morning, just weeks shy from his eighth birthday/anniversary, and now my home is filled with tears where a little white deaf cat once lived.

I'm angry that the remaining four to eight years I fully expected to have with him were taken from me. I'm angry that he died in distress with no warning. And that I was unable to do anything to help. I loved him with all my heart, and yet I still know I didn't deserve the love he offered me.

Rest in peace, my fearless Stupid Baby. I'll never forget you.

Bosko P. Carmichael, June 29, 2011 - May 11, 2019

Bosko's Tumblr can be found at https://iambosko.tumblr.com/, if you want to see almost eight years of cat photos.